Thursday, July 27, 2017
 

Key Questions

  • How can we support informed public response to changing environmental conditions?

Objective 1

Improved understanding of what kinds of information the public needs to make actionable decisions

NOAA’s broad mission results in the need for quite different decision support approaches with stakeholders and the public, e.g. regulatory issues for fisheries, stewardship for marine sanctuaries, and public safety for severe weather. NOAA requires social science research on which techniques are best for these sorts of applications, where there are commonalities and where there are differences. This involves studying perceptions of risk of individuals, businesses, and communities, as well as their capacity to alter their actions once they have decided to do so.

R&D Targets:

  • Assess how the public perceives risk and uses probabilistic information to make decisions

  • Develop decision-support tools to inform stakeholders and the public on the impacts of critical issues, situations, and subsequent actions

  • Determine which stakeholder engagement methodologies are most effective for eliciting requirements for each of the Mission goals

  • Determine how to efficiently keep stakeholder and public requirements current


Objective 2

Identify and measure NOAA’s policy and programmatic outcomes through social science research

The most appropriate way to describe policy and programmatic outcomes is with reference to NOAA’s mission and to the societal value generated by NOAA’s products and services. When social science capabilities are fully and appropriately integrated into NOAA activities, NOAA will be able to evaluate the contribution of its products and services with respect to the nation’s stock of coastal and marine resources, commercial and non-market economic activities, and changes in the health and safety of the nation’s citizens.

R&D Targets:

  • Conduct valuation assessments on priority NOAA programs, products and services

  • Develop a satellite account, with the Bureau of Economic Analysis, that links NOAA’s products and services to elements of the coastal and ocean economy